Monday, October 21, 2013

A Primitive Wooden Frame Backpack

A friend of mine asked me if I'd be interested in doing some minimalist backpacking this fall and winter, I really can't afford a bunch of ultralight gear, so I'm making do and fashioning my own, to a point. Over the weekend I knocked out this wooden A-frame backpack frame based on photos and descriptions of a Roycroft pack frame found on many survivalist forums, blogs and websites. Rather than slap three sticks together in the woods, I used some off-cuts laying around the garage to laminate in some curve and make the frame look a little more permanent and comfortable.

Roycroft A-frame backpack

I'm not a survival-minded person. I've had a couple of basic survival and primitive skills classes, I like the outdoors, camping, hiking, knives, axes, shooting guns and heirloom technologies, but I have no fear of the government nor do I think civilization is going to collapse anytime soon. I just like learning new stuff and knowing how to put it to use, if need be.

Roycroft A-frame backpack

With the Roycroft pack, your shelter tarp, ground cloth, blanket or poncho, becomes the pack. It's lashed to the frame in a way that's secure, but easy to access. Essentially cutting some weight off of what you're carrying, since the pack does double duty. Normally your pack is something of a one-trick-pony.

Roycroft A-frame backpack

Roycroft A-frame backpack

As a nod to any survivalists that might read this, I did use my Mora camp knife to cut up the old sacrificial daypack I used for the shoulder straps and the paracord I used for lashing. I do have great respect for your skills in the field, even if I don't necessarily share the enthusiasm.

mora camp knife

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