Tuesday, January 8, 2019

Cabin Camping, Firewood & Surprise, There's a Bat!

Cabin Camping, Firewood & Bats

Last weekend, my buddy Brian D. and I went down to his church friends' cabin about an hour south of Springfield. We stayed overnight Friday, then cut some firewood on Saturday before heading home.

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

Friday eve, we made it down about 7pm or so. Brian knocked out a dinner of steaks, potatoes and beans while I plinked around on my cigar box banjo. We sat up talking a bit before calling it a night close to 11pm, I hit the couch to read for a bit while Brian headed up to the loft.

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

Saturday, up about 8am. I made coffee and breakfast, testing out my Turkish coffee pot for use in cowboy coffee.

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

Then we headed out back of the cabin to walk the property some, looking for fatwood. We found a handful of downed eastern red cedars and cut the heavily resined fatwood from the upper facing branches of the fallen trees. It's very waxen in appearance when you cut it. I haven't tried yet, but it's supposed to burn very easily and can be used much like parrafin fire starter sticks.

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

After patrolling the grounds a bit, we got to work on why we came down for part of the weekend, the firewood. Brian took a chainsaw to a downed tree while I split the logs with a maul and axe. He then downed a hollow and dying elm. While he worked it over, again, with the chainsaw, I took to splitting the sections he was done with.

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

As I was splitting a wide hollow section, a live bat spilled out of the cavity I had just cleaved in two.

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

We placed the bat in separate hollow stump to recover. Which I believe it did, since we had another encounter with a low flying bat buzzing me as I was splitting more wood, before it circled the clearing and the area where the elm had stood 20 minutes earlier. It then went on its way up through the woods. Later in the day, as we were driving home, we saw a few more bats out flying over the road. That gave us some hope for the survivability of the one we wrestled from hibernation. If others were out of their own volition on an unseasonably warm January afternoon (60+ degrees F), then the one we disturbed would probably be fine.

Cabin Camping, Firewood and Bats

2 comments:

André Guyot said...

Nice blog Trevor! Winter cabin camping in your neck of the woods looks pretty sweet! Andre

Trevor said...

It's way too warm, really. That whole Climate Change we're not apparently having. It's made the past few winters overly mild. Good for getting out, but bad for everything else.